Ms. Jessica Riester

Jessica Riester

Jessica Riester

Jessica Riester is the Managing Editor/ Program Associate at AICGS, working on the Institute’s research programs and editing the Institute’s broad array of publications. Before joining AICGS, Ms. Riester worked at the OSU Foreign Language Center, for an Ohio senatorial campaign, and at the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin.

Ms. Riester received her MA in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her BA in Political Science and International Studies from The Ohio State University.

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Ms. Jessica Riester's Archive

Primaries and Caucuses in the U.S. Presidential Election

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Before American voters take to the polls on November 6, they will first narrow the field of candidates in a series of primaries, caucuses, and elections held in each of the 50 states. Primary A primary election is an election organized by the main political parties of each state and is intended… Read more >

Transatlantic Relations After the Lisbon Treaty: Ready for Action, or More Process?

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In Issue Brief 37, “Transatlantic Relations After the Lisbon Treaty: Ready for Action, or More Process?” AICGS Research Program/ Publications Coordinator Jessica Riester considers the European Union’s Lisbon Treaty with regard to the EU, the U.S., and Germany within the context of a more broadly international role. Ms. Riester discusses the Treaty’s key aspects for the EU institutions, foreign policy, and transatlantic relations, touching additionally on EU-NATO relations and the impact of the Lisbon Treaty on Germany and an enlarging EU.

Waiting for September: German-American Relations Between Elections

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As Germany approaches its September federal election, how will this election shape German-American relations in the coming months? In Issue Brief 30, Jessica Riester, Research Program/ Publications Coordinator at AICGS, examines the policy challenges facing the two countries and the expectations each country has for the other before and after the election, arguing that the German-American relationship can flourish in 2009 and beyond.