Reconciliation

The inability to accept the past by Japanese leaders stands in stark contrast to Germany's clear acknowledgment of its responsibility for the Holocaust. The deep layers of reconciliation Germany developed with France, Poland, Israel, and the Czech Republic stand in contrast to Japan's apologies to its neighbors, which have been thin, intermittent, and devoid of follow-up in bilateral policies toward China and South Korea that show a genuine desire to make amends. Germany’s experience—apologize, offer compensation, build other relationship—can serve as a guideline for continuing reconciliation in East Asia.

What Really Must Be Said

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As the dust slowly begins to settle following the uproar created by Günter Grass’s poem on Israel’s military stance towards Iran, Harry & Helen Gray Senior Fellow Dr. Lily Gardner Feldman takes an opportunity to highlight four lessons that relate to a larger context surrounding this affair: the depth, complexity, and fundamental stability of German-Israeli relations.

Constructive Power and Reconciliation: The Importance of German Societal Organizations

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The Importance of German Societal Actors The Euro-zone crisis has focused international attention on Germany’s power, depicting the Federal Republic either as selfless savior (constructive power) or as dictatorial demon (dominant power), depending on observers’ nationality and profession.  The spotlight has turned mainly on the motivations and maneuverability of Chancellor Angela Merkel… Read more >

Germany’s Exit from History?

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Buffeted by European and global headwinds, many in Germany wish for their country to “exit from history” and chart a more peaceful and insular course. But as Ludger Kühnhardt, Director at the Center for European Integration Studies at Universität Bonn and a regular contributor to the Advisor, argues, Germany can only engineer a good future for its people as an engine of further European integration, as a partner of the United States and as a defender of universal human rights. This essay originally appeared in the June 14, 2011, edition of The Globalist.

Germany, Israel, and the “Special Relationship”

In a new AICGS Podcast, AICGS Fellows Dr. Lily Gardner Feldman and Prof. Dr. Michael Brenner discuss with Dr. Jackson Janes the status of Germany’s “special relationship” with Israel after Chancellor Merkel’s visit and bilateral cabinet meetings, focusing on Germany’s role in the greater Middle East and the importance of interaction at all levels of society.