AICGS Advisor

What Really Must Be Said

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lily_gardner-feldman

As the dust slowly begins to settle following the uproar created by Günter Grass’s poem on Israel’s military stance towards Iran, Harry & Helen Gray Senior Fellow Dr. Lily Gardner Feldman takes an opportunity to highlight four lessons that relate to a larger context surrounding this affair: the depth, complexity, and fundamental stability of German-Israeli relations.

The Master Tactician

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Alexander Privitera

Facing increasing headwinds within her coalition, Merkel has decided to ask for a constitutional majority of two thirds of lawmakers to endorse the European fiscal pact, arguably her main personal achievement since the beginning of the crisis. It was a bold tactical move that could have far reaching consequences.

The ‘Good’ Week

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Alexander Privitera

In spite of some cautionary words from Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke on the economic recovery, this past week was a relatively good one for the financial markets. However, according to AICGS Senior Fellow Alexander Privitera, the mood could soon be changing.

Buying Time, Building Firewalls

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Alexander Privitera

European leaders have finally agreed to a deal that will send the next tranche of financial aid to embattled Greece in exchange for further austerity measures in Athens. According to Senior Fellow Alexander Privitera, while the deal will help Greece stay afloat in the short term, it increasingly signals that politicians in Europe may simply be buying time for an eventual Greek default.

Unwarranted Schadenfreude (or Why the Survival of the Euro Matters to Americans)

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dheisenberg

Schadenfreude [shahd-n-froi-duh] noun: satisfaction or pleasure felt at someone else’s misfortune  It’s very tempting for Americans to roll their eyes about the debt crisis in Greece, and to treat the entire European euro crisis as a remote parlor game, where the success or failure of Greece to stay in the euro is… Read more >

The Moral Dilemma

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Alexander Privitera

While promoting the work of his government to U.S. President Barack Obama, Italian Prime minister Mario Monti was suddenly asked by his host how he dealt with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. President Obama wanted to know, “How do you get through to her?” Three years into his presidency and after innumerable meetings… Read more >

Italian Lessons for Bernanke

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Alexander Privitera

Looking at Europe, FED Chairman Ben Bernanke has drawn some hard lessons that the U.S should be aware of. In fact, with the most acute phase of the Euro crisis somewhat abating, Bernanke feels compelled to issue a stern warning to U.S. politicians not to make the same mistakes made by some European countries, which have made them vulnerable to fiscal crisis. What happened to Europe could very well happen to the US, and more suddenly and sooner than many today think is possible.

European Visions in Davos

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Alexander Privitera

Alexander Privitera examines Chancellor Merkel’s speech at the World Economic Forum, in which she strongly defended the euro and laid out a plan for further European integration. According to Mr. Privitera, her words will not be enough to solve the euro crisis in the near future. However, the speech should help assure financial markets of Germany’s continued commitment to the euro and the project of European integration.

Germany’s Historical Euro Responsibility

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bindenageljd

In this Op-Ed, which originally appeared in Süddeutsche Zeitung on January 12, 2012, J.D. Bindenagel takes a brief look back at the history of Europe leading up to the push for a European Monetary Union. According to Mr. Bindenagel, the future success of the Euro rests on the will of Europe’s leaders, and Germany in particular, to make their monetary union work.

The Firewall

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Alexander Privitera

In a recent speech, International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde once again reminded Germany of the consequences of not acting on the current crisis. According to Alexander Privitera, while German officials were quick to shrug off the latest comments, Berlin may be more flexible in its options to help the euro than many believe.