Foreign & Domestic Policy

The Arab Awakening One Year On: A European Perspective

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moeller10

In early 2011, the debate in the European Union about the repercussions of the Arab awakening that started in late 2010 and continues to this day was largely framed in terms of opportunities rather than risks. The prospect of democracy finally making headway in one of the most static regions of the… Read more >

Assessing Transatlantic Risks: The Erosion of Allied Solidarity

Ann-Kristin Otto

Approaching its summit in Chicago in May, NATO is desperately looking for a positive message to spread. But there’s little good news to be found on all major fronts. Intentions to paint a picture of success in Afghanistan while conducting its own withdrawal are being overrun by events on the ground.  The… Read more >

New Ground for Cooperation: The Arab Spring as a Turning Point for EU-Turkey Relations

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rislam

Though politicians use the word “historic” in a fairly inflationary way, there is no better terminology for describing what the international community is witnessing in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The uprisings that are sweeping over the region astonished Western observers as they replaced an existent narrative. After the 9/11… Read more >

The Question of Military Action Against Iran – Of Busted Bunker Hopes and Short Fuses

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d_hellmuth

Iran’s nuclear ambitions – and the West’s response – are analyzed by Non-Resident Fellow Dorle Hellmuth.

Germany in Europe – From Vanguard to Laggard and Back Again?

herborth

Commenting on German foreign policy is hampered by the fact that this is a moving target,[1] today more so than ever,  To complicate things further, the target not only moves quickly, it also changes direction in an apparently erratic manner. Accordingly, Germany has been making global headlines as a general source of… Read more >

European Energy Security: A New Pattern of External Stability and Internal Risks

schroer2

This essay examines recent developments in European energy policy and analyzes improvements and shortcomings of energy security, primarily in the field of fossil fuels. It argues that Europe has successfully addressed some external energy security risks, the gravest problems of energy security currently originate inside Europe itself due to insufficient funding of necessary infrastructure projects.

Immigrants in Foreign Policy Making in Germany and the U.S.: Two Very Different Struggles to Embrace Diversity

rytz

In a globalized world, domestic politics no longer stop at the water’s edge, as transnational actors have emerged who push beyond existing borders. Some are driven by hybrid identities that reach beyond the contours of the nation-state. These ethnic interest groups represent immigrants and pursue a particular interest in foreign policy toward… Read more >

Politics of Dilemma: Turkish and EU Approaches Toward Syria

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rislam

As Turkey continues to push for membership in the EU, many factors play a role in whether or not its acceptance will take hold. In this Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Rana Deep Islam looks at Turkey and the EU’s respective foreign policy strategies, using the recent unrest in Syria as a… Read more >

German Security Policy on the Move – Challenges In and Post Afghanistan

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niedermeier

In this Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Pia Niedermeier writes that Germany has arguably changed policy amid domestic and international constraints and has become an active partner in the ISAF mission in Afghanistan despite prior reservations. Ms. Niedermeier contends that two main challenges remain for German-American relations and Germany’s role in the transatlantic alliance in and beyond this mission – a narrative gap and a strategic gap – which need to be addressed to ensure that all sides are on the same page for future missions.

The Role of the German Jewish Community in Postwar Germany’s International Recognition

brenner

In a new Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Prof. Dr. Michael Brenner analyzes the role the Jewish past and the small contemporary Jewish community played in the foreign policy of the two German states before 1989, and to a smaller extent of unified Germany. The symbolic role the Jewish community played in the recognition of West Germany as a major player on the international stage was one of importance, Prof. Dr. Brenner argues, but in contrast, only during its last years of existence did the GDR use its official Jewish community to improve its foreign relations.